Dating hand planes Free amateur adult site with chatroom

These features are avoided where possible, along with features that appear in only some planes of a given type (i.e. Where possible, the flowchart uses parts that were probably replaced less often, such as frogs, depth adjustment screws and lateral adjustment levers.This approach doesn't guarantee that you'll date your plane correctly, as the flowchart can be thrown off by some hybrids.

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The flowchart starts by asking questions about the cast iron bed of your plane.

I've chosen the bed as a starting point because it has many easily identifiable markings, and it probably wasn't replaced that often.

All that said, there are some red flags to look for when shopping for hand planes, and with the abundance of vintage planes available on e Bay, yard sales, and tool swaps across the country, there’s no reason to settle for a tool with serious problems. Body & Sole Also sometimes referred to as the ‘base’ or ‘shoe,’ the body of the plane, as the name implies, is the main frame.

The challenge is knowing what is serious, and what isn’t. The sole is the surface that comes in contact with the wood when using the plane.

I've converted some of the plane dating information found in Patrick Leach's Plane Type Study into an easy-to-use hypertext flowchart.

Hopefully by answering a few questions about your plane you can determine which type it is.

When I first started buying and collecting vintage hand planes, much of the available information I read online included ominous warnings about warped, twisted soles, unstable frogs, and mangled throats.

Sounded more like a Stephen King movie than a discussion about tools!

With recommendations for evaluation that involved engineering squares and feeler gauges.

I was convinced that no vintage plane I purchased could ever possibly work correctly until I lapped the sole and re-machined every contact surface.

* Estimated, Extrapolated, or Unconfirmed ~ Represents an approximate date *** Tools shown in the photos on this site were returned to functional condition by Virginia Toolworks using museum quality archival preservation techniques.

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